Sunday, November 18, 2012

Bay Circuit Trail: Duxbury, Thanksgiving Heartland.



My piece on Duxbury last year was seen from afar. I mainly wanted to gather what I could on the place as a form of aggregation content so people would have a handy overview of it.


This year, I was able to actually visit and make video clips of all the open space parcels currently carrying the Bay Circuit Trail

If you live in the area and find yourself wanting to walk off the effects of our national feast day, you would do well to roam the wondrous array awaiting you.




It is the benchmark town for best practices in trail operations in its region, a very good model. There is fairly complete online information about the conservation properties, nice maps that blend art with craft and first rate follow through on the ground operations. 

Rules are enforced regarding motorized things, often by design at trailhead points and yet the rules are congenial and thought through. Dog owners are required to have the dog under control without specifics on how this control is attained. This affixes liability on the owner with minimal specifics.





The participating parcels are a mix of re-purposed cranberry tracts and town forests of some ancientry.



The westernmost spot is the Thaddeus Chandler Natural Area. Of the several former cranberry bog properties, it has had the most time to go wild and has stands of trees four or more decades old growing in bog ghosts. It also has a segment of early period cart path of a provenance comparable to the original Thanksgiving celebrants.



Heading to the water you'll next find a forest tract called the Lansing Bennett. It was a former trout hatchery. It may assume a key role soon as the trail route resolves toward Pembroke.



Following that is a more recently acquired cranberry bog area called the Duxbury Bogs. It may well be the perfect size for a good holiday stroll.



And then there is the Round Pond property with a substantial trail mix that includes forests sections along with the cranberry bogs and wetlands.